Time as a Resource Part 2: Multiplayer Map Design

In my last post we discussed how map design can greatly impact the quality of single player missions. At the end we came away with the conclusions that what we want from a good map is: – Naturally encourages a player to interact with the map and their opponent – Use subtle methods to encourage…

RTS101 – Evolve or Die

Please note – this article is an attempt to address a fairly common issue I see with novice players of real-time strategy games: a sense of complacency Strategy games, especially real-time strategy games, are often seen as inaccessible or intimidating to the uninitiated. Most other genres, from first-person shooters to role-playing games often have fairly…

Battlefield uncertainty and fog of war

Almost since the inception of games, game designers have known that giving all participants universal and precise access to complete information about a game’s state can be a roadblock to the skill and fun derived from playing. In card games such as War, Rummy, Blackjack and Poker for instance, at least one or more of each player’s cards…

Random thoughts on resource management in RTS

Strategy games, especially those in the Real Time Strategy genre, tend to follow a common formula. In each match, the players start with limited resources: typically, a single “command center” structure and a handful of scouting or economy-focused units, depending on the systems the game uses for resource gathering. From there, players will typically mine,…

An argument against the turtle

OK, this post is really not about the animal the turtle. I have nothing against those, and in fact think that turtles are kind of interesting. No, this is about the phenomenon of ‘turtling’ in strategy games.